Sarah Peck received the Chester County 2020 Citizen Planner Award on April 25 2019. The non profit organization promotes managed growth and preservation of open space through education and dialogue between Cuonty’s civic, business and political leaders. Pictured above: Dorothy Ives Dewey, Chester County 2020 board member,  David Ward, Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, Sarah Peck, Judy DiFilippo, Chester County 2020 board member and Chester County Commissioner Kathi Cozzone. Read text of Sarah Peck’s acceptance speech here:
Arbor Knoll, created on the heels of the highly successful Arbor Heights and Arbor Mews communities, plays an integral role in transforming Norristown into a thriving and desirable neighborhood in which to live, work, and play. Gathered for a ribbon-cutting at Arbor Knoll on Wednesday are, from left, Montgomery County Commissioner Ken Lawrence, Rep. Tim Briggs (D-149th Dist.), developer Sarah Peck, Montgomery County Commissioner Val Arkoosh, Municipal Administrator Crandall Jones, and Norristown Municipal Council member Valerie Scott Cooper. Missing from photo is Council president   Read Article Here

MALVERN—Chester County 2020 will honor Sarah Peck, principal of Progressive New Homes and David Ward, former assistant director of the Chester County Planning Commission, during the organization’s annual reception on April 25.

“Chester County is blessed to have excellent professionals planning for our county’s growth and future,” said John B. Hannum, Jr., Chairman of Chester County 2020. “This year our organization is honoring two outstanding planners, Sarah and David.”

Peck is being given the Citizen Planner award of 2019. She is a recognized expert on infill housing development and the concept’s growing acceptance in suburban communities. Peck is a former CEO of Rouse/Chamberlin Homes of Exton and co-founder of the Housing Partnership of Chester County.

Peck was named “National Builder of the Year” by Professional Builder Magazine and has served as adjunct professor of West Chester University. Progressive New Homes builds progressive, affordably-priced homes in Chester and Montgomery counties.

Ward is being given the organization’s Lifetime Achievement award. He has been involved in planning for more than 40 years and retired in 2018 from Chester County’s Planning Commission. Ward played a key role in developing the county’s award-winning Landscapes program and managed the first revision of the plan, Landscapes 2.

Ward worked tirelessly with county municipalities during his tenure with Chester County and will continue to serve as an instructor and board member of the PA Municipal Education Institute. The reception will take place on April 25 at the Chester Valley Golf Club, 430 Swedesford Road, Malvern. A cocktail hour will begin at 6:00 p.m. and the program will start at 7:00 p.m. For a ticket, send a check for $85 to CC2020, P. O. Box 321 Lyndell, PA 19343. To register online, go to www.CC202.org and visit the Secure Registration in the organization’s safe shopping section. The online registration fee is $88. For questions, call 484-680-5570 or email info@cc2020.org. The master of ceremonies for the event will be Ken Knickerbocker, publisher of American Community Journals, a network that includes VISTA.Today. He is a former Chester County2020 board member and a prior member of Parkesburg Borough Council. Chester County 2020 is a non-profit organization helping to create livable communities by bringing people together to find common ground and then working to transform dialogue into action. For more information, see www.cc2020.org.

Arbor Knoll, created on the heels of the highly successful Arbor Heights and Arbor Mews communities, plays an integral role in transforming Norristown into a thriving and desirable neighborhood in which to live, work, and play. Gathered for a ribbon-cutting at Arbor Knoll on Wednesday are, from left, Montgomery County Commissioner Ken Lawrence, Rep. Tim Briggs (D-149th Dist.), developer Sarah Peck, Montgomery County Commissioner Val Arkoosh, Municipal Administrator Crandall Jones, and Norristown Municipal Council member Valerie Scott Cooper. Missing from photo is Council president Sonya Sanders.

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Bryn Mawr’s newest boutique: Grove 1.2.1

Thursday, September 20, 2018 3:41 PM Grove 121 Staff

The seasoned styling team at the new Bryn Mawr boutique, Grove 1.2.1: Wendie Rubinstein, owner Sandy Edelstein and Cindy Cherry. Rubinstein and Edelstein worked at Ella’s Grove and Cherry was a stylist at Skirt.

Empowerment is everything at the new Bryn Mawr boutique Grove 1.2.1, a shop that sells self-confidence alongside sweaters, that builds community as it builds your fall wardrobe.

The store motto: Own who you are. If you love yourself, you can take on the world. (Talk about retail therapy.)

A handpicked assortment of sportswear, accessories and notions (brands you won’t find in nearby stores) surround the room’s focal point: a comfy seating area. The message: take a load off, talk to us, tell us what you’re looking for.

As conceived by its petite powerhouse owner, Sandy Edelstein, Grove 1.2.1 believes shopping should be one to one. Personal. Customized. Practical.

If a style doesn’t flatter or feel good, forget it.

So button-front blouses at Grove 1.2.1 don’t gap, bell sleeves don’t graze dinner plates, distressed denim hides thighs with discreet patches. Fabrics are soft. Leathers are washable.

Clothes are classic but not preppy, on trend but not faddish. (Edelstein says she tried on every garment herself before deciding to carrying it.)

But Grove 1.2.1 is about more than making you look good. In keeping with its girl-power mission, the store will host after-hours talks on wellness, civic life, or, our personal fave: the secret to a 102-year-old’s staying power, when the guest speaker will be Edelstein’s inspiring grandmother, Rosalie Goldstein. At evening events, cash registers will be closed. No shopping allowed. Refreshing, right?

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Retail runs in Edelstein’s DNA. Her great grandfather owned the iconic Philly department store, Silverman’s.

A woman of wide-ranging talents, Edelstein has been a portrait photographer and personal trainer, managed a fashion store at the mall, and, until it closed last year, was a stylist at Ella’s Grove in Haverford Square.

What’s in store: casual and out-to-dinner duds including quality tees and camis from $50, separates (pants, jeans, blouses and sweaters) from $160. Jackets and blazers top out around $700, belts and bags $72 – $1,000; fashion jewelry, gifts and organic skincare under $100.

Grove 1.2.1, 484-380-2540, 821 W. Lancaster Ave. (across from Bryn Mawr Film Institute), is open Mondays, noon to 5, Tues. – Sat. 10 to 6, Sundays noon to 4. Evening hours by appointment. Dogs welcome.